2020 Guild School

June 13-19, 2020     Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, Maine

12 Hour Classes

Diane Almeyda - Metal Sign and Bracket
Jeanie Anderson - Deep Dish Pie with Ice Cream
Jeanie Anderson - Martini Board
Pete & Pam Boorum - Brides Boxes and Pantry Boxes
Annelle Ferguson - Needlepoint Panel for a Handheld Fire Screen
Natalia Frank - Embroidered Aprons as a Fashion Statement
Pat Hartman - French Knot “Hooked” Rug
Daniela Kiefhaber - Native American Beadwork Leather Clothing
Miyuki Kobayashi - Green Aquariums in Glass Bowls
Tim Kraft - Late 1800’s Chandelier
Iulia Chin Lee - Gilded Vase or Bowl
Chris Malcomson - Victorian Parquetry Sewing Box, c. 1860
Marcia McClain - Traditional Sofa
Marcia McClain - Chair and Ottoman
Mary Grady O’Brien - A Sailor’s Delight
Sandy Rubin - Silk Spider Plant
Kim Stewart - Wicker Conversation Chair
Sue Veeder - “Sailing on Penobscot Bay”
Mariella Vitale - Crochet Teddy Bear
Michael Yurkovic - Aluminum Folding Chair

Almeyda

INSTRUCTOR: Diane Almeyda, Artisan
COURSE: Metal Work
PROJECT: Metal Sign and Bracket

A sign can be decorative and/or informational. It can be placed just about anywhere…outside a shop or home, in a shop window, on a door, etc. It can be whimsical or elegant. There are so many ways to decorate a miniature scene with a sign that no one should be without at least one!

This class will teach students metal working skills (including forming, soldering and sawing) while they make a miniature metal bracket and sign. The instructor is willing to let students personalize the project as far as size and design if contacted well prior to class to discuss their thoughts regarding feasibility in the medium we will be using. There will also be a couple of options available for all students.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: flex shaft, drill press

SKILL LEVEL: All levels. Ability to see well with magnification; ability to use hands and fingers; and to be able to sit for a period of time.

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school

Anderson

INSTRUCTOR: Jeanie Anderson, Artisan
COURSE: Polymer Clay Food
PROJECT: Deep Dish Pie with Ice Cream

Who can resist a deep-dish apple or cherry pie with a perfectly browned, sugared crust, especially when its paired with vanilla ice cream?

Students will make up to four lattice-top pies from polymer clay—some whole, and some with slices. Students may choose an apple or cherry filling, or try both. They will learn how to color and use liquid clay effectively; how to create convincing textures of the crust, fillings and ice cream; and how to shade with chalk pastel.

Each student will receive a glass pie stand, three metal pie pans and one beautiful handmade ceramic pie plate made by IGMA Artisan, Jane Graber; as well as a custom-made pie crimping tool and illustrated instructions to reference at home.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school. There will be additional ceramic pie plates available for an optional fee.

Anderson

INSTRUCTOR: Jeanie Anderson, Artisan
COURSE: Polymer Clay Food
PROJECT: Martini Board

In this appetizing class, we will create a gourmet cocktail board that will complement almost any miniature scene.

Students will explore simple but effective polymer clay sculpting techniques, as well as shading with chalk pastel and working with molds and resin. They will also shape their own marble trays and learn how to modify a bottle using two-part epoxy resin and enamel paint.

Each student will be provided with all the accessories shown plus an additional martini glass, reusable mold for the walnuts, and illustrated instructions to reference at home.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school. There will be liquor bottles, martini glasses, and cheese mold available for an additional fee.

boorum

INSTRUCTOR: Pam & Pete Boorum, Artisans
COURSE: Woodworking
PROJECT: Brides Boxes and Pantry Boxes

There is always a need to have a place to store things and special wooden boxes had a prominent place in the household and retail world before cardboard changed our lives. This class offers two different styles.

The Brides Box was meant to hold special treasures that were a part of her trousseau. Often beautifully decorated and painted with the happy couple’s names and wedding date, this decoration will be left to later efforts. Students will concentrate on cutting the parts, bending them around forms, fitting the lid bands and shaping the tops and lids.

Pantry Boxes were made for dry storage, both commercially and domestically. Students will work with several sizes, the basic techniques being the same as the Brides Box. However, the pantry boxes usually featured nails or tacks to secure the overlap. Students will do these in miniature as well.

Painting and/or aging will be an option for the students in this class. More elaborate decoration is “on your own.”

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: table saw, disk sander

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner and intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $40 to be collected at school

Ferguson

INSTRUCTOR: Annelle Ferguson, Fellow
COURSE: Needlepoint
PROJECT: Needlepoint Panel for a Handheld Fire Screen

Imagine living over two hundred years ago and it being very cold outside. The only warmth in the home is from a blazing log fire. It would be more than one hundred years or so before electricity was available and gas was not used until the early to mid 19th century. The 18th century woman was well aware of the hazards of standing or sitting too close to an open flame. They were subjected to damaging their make-up or clothing. Many were probably humiliated when the hems of their gowns caught on fire or by having the roaring fire melt their manicured face.

Therefore, handheld fire screens were created. Made of various materials, these screens could be used by women to shield their faces while warming the rest of their body. The screen might be embroidered, hand-painted or embellished with precious gems. The handles were usually carved from wood.

In this class, students will needlepoint a small panel to be attached to a turned handle created especially for this class by Mark Murphy. The approximate measurements are 7/8" H x 5/8" W. Referring to antique screens for inspiration, students will sketch and chart a pattern on graph paper. They may select to needlepoint their panel on either #58 or #72 silk gauze, using silk threads. A partial chart, for stitching on #58 silk gauze, will be available for those not wanting to design their own pattern. Class discussions will include the essentials for setting up the project and in the selection of colors, plus adapting antique designs into 1/12 scale.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely. If not, students will have all the necessary instructions and materials to finish the needlepoint at home.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate and advanced. Students should be experienced with basic needlepoint and feel comfortable working on #58 or smaller count silk gauze.

MATERIALS FEE: $65, includes turned handle by Mark Murphy, to be collected at school

Frank

INSTRUCTOR: Natalia Frank, Artisan
COURSE: Needlework
PROJECT: Embroidered Aprons as a Fashion Statement

Aprons enjoy a long and illustrious history both as a protective garment in the kitchen and as a fashion accessory outside the home. The word “apron” comes from the French word napperon, which means tablecloth. Aprons became a fashion statement in the 1500s, when women started adorning them with expensive lace and embroidery. As a fashion, the wearing of aprons has waxed and waned in popularity over the years.

During this fun workshop the students will have an opportunity to create a miniature, fashionable, embroidered apron to bring the history back. The finest fabric and finest silk floss will be used while applying a wide variety of embroidery stitches used in the 17th to 18th century. The students will choose a design and learn how to trace it onto fabric. Different ways of finishing the edges of the apron and construction will be demonstrated. Finished aprons will be displayed on the mannequins that are provided within a kit.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $80 to be collected at school. The Needlework System 4 Table and Frame Clamps stitching stand will be provided for use in class. Students have the option of purchasing it for $350.

Hartman

INSTRUCTOR: Pat Hartman, Fellow
COURSE: Needlework
PROJECT: French Knot “Hooked” Rug

Hooked material has been found as far back as 5th century Egypt. Hooking skills were brought to America from Europe, but the craft is now considered a distinctly North American folk art. The creative peak of rug hooking was in the early 19th century in New England and the Canadian Maritime Provinces. This technique was mainly used to make area rugs, stair runners, welcome mats and bed coverings; often using material from clothing that was no longer serviceable.

The class project is an adaptation of a hooked rug found on the internet that was listed for sale at an auction house. The auction listing states the rug was “American folk art, New York, 1800.” The class rug is done using French knots which give a very good scale “hooked” rug look. The focus of the class is for students to learn and/or perfect the French knot stitch so they are uniform in size. The finished rug measures approximately 3" x 4". There will also be discussion on design, color and resource materials.

time: 12 hours. Completion is unlikely. However, students will go home with all the techniques and materials to finish on their own.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $25 to be collected at school

Kiefhaber

INSTRUCTOR: Daniela Kiefhaber, Artisan
COURSE: Leather Work and Bead Work
PROJECT: Native American Beadwork Leather Clothing

Beadwork is a Native American art form which uses glass beads imported from Europe for almost five centuries. Today dance regalia feature a variety of beadwork styles. The shown style is inspired by several styles, including the Great Lakes district, Yakima, Northern Plains and Dakota, which all featured some sort of floral designs. In class students will discuss many styles as well. The shown examples are a vest, trousers and tiny moccasins, all sized to fit a child. Students are very welcome to pick a garment they would like to reproduce in miniature. Easy techniques for pattern construction, leatherwork and seam construction will be shown. The main focus will be on application of the tiniest vintage Venetian glass beads in the chosen design with several hints and tricks offered by the instructor.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $30 to be collected at school

kobayashi

INSTRUCTOR: Miyuki Kobayashi, Artisan
COURSE: Clay Fish and Plant Making
PROJECT: Green Aquariums in Glass Bowls

Nature aquariums and bottle aquariums are recently becoming very popular because of having a more natural look and containing a lot of plants. People can enjoy fish and plants at the same time in a pleasing container.

In this class students will learn how to make fish, as usual, and various kinds of plants. They will make two different types of green glass aquariums. The instructor will provide a variety of styles of glass bowls for students to choose from. Goldfish and tropical fish were selected for the prototypes, but if students want, they can make other fish, like a neon tetra.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely for two bowls.

POWER TOOLS: None.

SKILL LEVEL: All levels.

MATERIALS FEE: $34 to be collected at school

Kraft

INSTRUCTOR: Tim Kraft, Artisan
COURSE: Electrical Techniques
PROJECT: Late 1800’s Chandelier

This 8-bulb chandelier has the classic styling of the late 1800’s. In 1871, when the light bulb was first designed, it had enormous novelty value and the earliest fixtures displayed the bulb and its filaments quite prominently. The bulbs used in this fixture simulate the characteristic incandescent bulbs of that era.

The oversize bulbs will cast a warm glow or light up a room, depending on the voltage applied after completion. This is a beginner’s project where students will learn wood bending techniques and precision soldering.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: Beginning and intermediate. Note: This project does use Epoxy Glue.

MATERIALS FEE: $55 to be collected at school

Lee

INSTRUCTOR: Iulia Chin Lee, Artisan
COURSE: Turning Wooden Bowls with Gilding
PROJECT: Gilded Vase or Bowl

This course is a lovely introduction to basic techniques of lathe turning. Students will gain an understanding of, and familiarity with, turning tools and their proper use. They will also learn how to create different contours and shapes. Through practice, the students will be able to develop these skills, which will enable them to create beautiful, artistic pieces.

Beginners will receive individual coaching and instruction, especially during the basic wood turning. Students will be turning a variety of woods, including some exotic wood. Lastly, the focus will be on gilding. Students will learn how to prepare the surface of their turnings, how to apply size, and how to gild.

The main techniques include: 1) turning basic cylindrical shapes with variations—beginners will turn bowls and intermediate students will turn vases; 2) hollowing turned objects on a lathe; 3) final finishing and applying finish on a lathe; 4) preparing surface for gilding; and 5) applying gold leaf gilding.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: lathe

SKILL LEVEL: Beginning and intermediate

MATERIALS FEE: $55 to be collected at school. Students need to have their own micro turning tools in class. Those who do not have turning tools may purchase hollowing tools made by Harmony Water. Also, a Robert Sorby micro-turning, high quality tool set, made in England, is an option for $150.

malcomson

INSTRUCTOR: Chris Malcomson, Artisan
COURSE: Furniture Construction/Parquetry
PROJECT: Victorian Parquetry Sewing Box, c. 1860

Sewing boxes come in a dizzying array of different shapes and sizes. Some are quite simple in design, but others were much more elaborate. They were an essential tool in an age where things were made by hand at home. This example comes from a period when many new and exotic woods were coming in from all over the empire. The walnut panels are bordered with complex parquetry work, polished to a rich golden color.

Students will first assemble a dovetailed box before moving on to the complex veneer work. They’ll be learning many parquetry techniques including handmade cross bandings, as well as hinging and fitting out the box. The approximate measurements are 7/8" H x 1 1/8 th W x 1" D. The class will be very informative and most importantly, great fun.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: drill press

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner

MATERIALS FEE: $40 to be collected at school

McClain

INSTRUCTOR: Marcia McClain, Artisan
COURSE: Upholstery/Fabric
PROJECT: Traditional Sofa

This sofa is an elegant version of a sofa that spans quite a time period from perhaps the 1930s to present time. It has an inviting feeling of comfort with its deep padded back and arms. It is shown in the striped fabric with a waterfall skirt but may be altered to the student’s taste to a traditional skirt or the fringed skirt shown in the second photo. Depending on one’s choice of skirt treatment and fabric, it may be very elegant or quite casual. The instructor will work with students to pick a fabric prior to class so that the sofa can go home and effortlessly find a place in its new home.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner. Simple sewing experience will help in handling fabrics comfortably.

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school

McClain

INSTRUCTOR: Marcia McClain, Artisan
COURSE: Upholstery/Fabric
PROJECT: Chair and Ottoman

A chair and ottoman are a very versatile furniture combination. Together they provide a refuge for one to relax and enjoy life in a number of places in a home. This particular chair and ottoman are copies of a traditional loose back lounge chair and ottoman owned by the instructor. Each student will be given a chair and ottoman form to create their own version of the pieces in a variety of fabrics and ribbon colors to go with their decorating scheme. The resulting finished product may be formal or informal and feminine or masculine depending on the colors and textures of the fabric one chooses.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely if students work overtime on their own outside of the classroom.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: Beginner. Simple sewing experience will help in handling fabrics comfortably.

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school

O'Brien

INSTRUCTOR: Mary Grady O’Brien, Fellow
COURSE: Folk Art Painting and Shell Work
PROJECT: A Sailor’s Delight

The purpose of this class is twofold. To learn some basic techniques to encourage decorating with shells and to develop a nautical oil painting that will reflect the magic of the sea. Students can follow the explicit pattern provided in class or develop their own creation. Some students prefer more direction, while others have a definite personal preference. Both are acceptable because this is a project that allows for flexibility for creative expression.

The instructor’s goal is for student to enjoy the learning experience in a relaxed manner and end the week with additional confidence and skill. This project promises to be a lovely remembrance of time spent enjoying the beauty of Maine.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $50 to be collected at school

Rubin

INSTRUCTOR: Sandy Rubin, Fellow
COURSE: Fiber Arts
PROJECT: Silk Spider Plant

Students will create from silk taffeta a large spider plant and it’s “babies.” Students will learn how to adhere taffeta pieces together to create the base plant material. They will learn to hand cut, hand color, and assemble the silk spider plant in a container. Students will utilize special liquid acrylic paints and learn painting techniques using a different type of tool. They will also learn how to arrange the spider plant in a custom container and add the tiny branches with babies on them to offer a realistic-looking plant.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected in advance of school

Stewart

INSTRUCTOR: Kim Stewart, Artisan
COURSE: Wicker Furniture Construction
PROJECT: Wicker Conversation Chair

The conversation chair goes by many names, tête-à-tête (head to head), gossip chair, courting bench and kissing bench. Dating in Victorian times was routinely supervised by chaperones watching over the young couple every moment. The conversation chair was perfect for romantic encounters—allowing couples to sit close without ever touching. With its pleasing S-shaped symmetry, the conversation chair is the centerpiece of any room that it lives in—a formal parlor, sitting room or entryway.

The conversation chair is woven using waxed linen cord over paper covered wires. Students begin by preparing the pre-cut wood base by drilling the holes that support the wire spokes and next they paint the base and wires, if they choose. Emphasis will be placed on the weaving and shaping of the chair together with incorporating a diamond pattern into each chair back. Students will make a braid trim which will be applied to the arm roll edge. Finishing the chair is by wrapping the legs with cord and setting the feet into small brass-colored caps.

Students will be provided with fabric by the instructor for the construction of an upholstered, tufted seat cushion or they may wish to bring their own 100% cotton fabric to coordinate with their decor.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: drill press

SKILL LEVEL: All levels. Good eye-hand coordination is a must along with a little patience.

MATERIALS FEE: $40 to be collected at school

Veeder

INSTRUCTOR: Sue Veeder, Fellow
COURSE: Painting with Heat Set Oils
PROJECT: “Sailing on Penobscot Bay”

The painting is an original by the instructor, based on photos taken during many visits to Castine and Guild School. The simple color scheme, the sparkle on the water—you can almost smell the ocean! The view is mostly from Battle Avenue toward Dyce Head Light, looking down on the bay.

This very complete class will teach students how to prepare a canvas in the correct scale for miniatures; sketching; color blending from basic colors; proper brush use; various brush techniques and many other things. The beauty of the Genesis heat set oil paints that will be used is that there are NO fumes, and once the paint is set with heat, students can continue painting immediately! Students will love these paints and their texture, ability to blend, and ease of use.

Materials provided will be detailed instructions, color charts, paints, thinners, palette, paint brushes and more. If students have, or can borrow, an embossing tool/heat gun, please bring it—otherwise there will be several for use in class. It’s helpful to have your own, as everyone works at different speeds. The finished painting is about 3 1/8" W. This is a fun, relaxing and rewarding class. Even if students have never tried painting before, they will be surprised to see that they CAN do this and have a lovely painting of the water as a souvenir from their week at Guild School.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels are welcome, especially beginners.

MATERIALS FEE: $60 to be collected at school. Handmade frames may be available for purchase in class.

Vitale

INSTRUCTOR: Mariella Vitale, Fellow
COURSE: Needlework
PROJECT: Crochet Teddy Bear

A little bit of history about teddy bears. The name “Teddy Bear” comes from a former United States president, Theodore Roosevelt, who was commonly known as Teddy. The teddy bear was inspired by a cartoon depicting President Roosevelt having compassion for a bear at the end of an unsuccessful hunting trip in Mississippi in 1902. Morris Michtom, a businessman and inventor, saw the drawing and created a tiny plush bear cub which he sent to Roosevelt. After receiving permission to use Roosevelt’s name, Michtom put a plush bear in his shop window with a sign “Teddy’s bear.” At the same time in Germany, the Steiff firm, unaware of Michtom’s bear, produced a stuffed bear from Richard Steiff’s designs. Although Steiff and Michtom were both making teddy bears at around the same time, neither would have known of the other’s creation!

The teddy bear became an iconic children’s toy, celebrated in story, songs, and films. Since the creation of the first teddy bears which were made to look like real bears, with extended snouts and beady eyes, “teddies” have greatly varied in form, style, color and material. Modern teddy bears tend to have larger eyes and foreheads and smaller noses, baby-like features that enhance the toy’s cuteness. They have become collector’s items, with older and rarer “teddies” appearing at public auctions. The world’s most expensive teddy bear, Steiff’s “Teddy Girl,” was sold at an auction in 1994 for over USD $143,000! Teddy bear artists often create OOAK teddies for collectors. Sewn teddy bears are made from a wide range of materials including felt, cotton and velour. While many are stitched, others are made from yarn, either knitted or crocheted.

Students in this class will make a tiny teddy bear with the technique of amigurumi. Amigurumi is a Japanese word that means “crocheted or knitted stuffed toy” and is the Japanese art of knitting or crocheting small, stuffed yarn creatures. The word is a mix between the word ami, meaning “crocheted or knitted,” and nuigurumi, meaning “stuffed doll.” The project requires students to know how to single crochet, how to work in rounds (like you do with doilies) and how to increase and decrease. Students will be given an original crochet pattern and all the tips and tricks of miniature crocheting—how to invisibly decrease, how to seamlessly change the colors and how to joint the arms. If students feel uncomfortable with crocheting with tatting thread and a small hook but want to make the bear, the teacher will provide a bigger thread and a bigger crochet hook to make it.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school

Yurkovic

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Yurkovic, Artisan
COURSE: Fabricating Aluminum Tubing
PROJECT: Aluminum Folding Chair

Students will create a 1/12 scale aluminum folding chair, made of aluminum tubing that actually folds like the real thing! Using a series of jigs prepared by the instructor, students will bend, form, and drill aluminum tubing with the use of no power tools to form the chair parts. The parts will then be assembled in another special wooden jig to create the frame. Students will then pick from a choice of colors for the strapping on their chairs, and proceed to lace the straps and finish the chair.

time: 12 hours. Completion is likely.

POWER TOOLS: None

SKILL LEVEL: All levels

MATERIALS FEE: $35 to be collected at school