Colonial Williamsburg Classes

Views of out and inside the Wetherburn Dairy, subject of Patricia Richards' class.

Views of out and inside the Wetherburn Dairy, subject of Patricia Richards’ class.

With the much anticipated Maysville Study Program front and center in many peoples’ minds, the preregistration deadline for the Williamsburg Study Program is rapidly approaching, seemingly very much under the radar. This study program, which has been a yearly fixture in Colonial Williamsburg for more than 20 years, is a fabulous post-holiday get-away. Virginia’s Colonial Williamsburg is a fabulous location for this little retreat with its plethora of lovely historic buildings, relatively mild, mid-winter weather and reasonable hotel prices.

Like all past programs, this year’s Study Program has four great classes on the schedule, taught by experienced Artisan and Fellow members of the Guild, with projects drawn from the collections of Colonial Williamsburg. Pete and Pam Boorum will be teaching an 18th century side table that hails from their home state of New Hampshire. Jane Graber will be instructing her students in the shaping and decorating of red ware plates, bowls and platters. Patricia Richards will guide her students through construction of a 1/12 scale version of the Wetherburn Dairy that sits behind the tavern of the same name on Duke of Gloucester Street, and Bill Studebaker will be helping his students build a dressing glass (mirror) patterned on one that has come to this historic town from Charleston, South Carolina.

The 18th century New Hampshire side table that is the inspiration for Pete and Pam Boorum's class.

The 18th century New Hampshire side table that is the inspiration for Pete and Pam Boorum’s class.

For those that are interested, there is also an exclusive behind the scenes tour to visit the warehouse where are stored the architectural fragments from Williamsburg’s important colonial structures. The study of these fragments provides restorers an invaluable stream of information from which informed guesses can be made as to which materials and colors would be most appropriate for their work.

The dressing glass (mirror and drawer) originally made in South Carolina, that will be the inspiration for Bill Studebaker's class.

The dressing glass (mirror and drawer) originally made in South Carolina, that will be the inspiration for Bill Studebaker’s class.

As part of the study program, registered students and guests each receive a pass that admits them to Colonial Williamsburg museums and historic buildings for the duration of the program; as well as affording them a discount on their purchases there. The special IGMA rate at the Lodge is good for days before and after the program so you can stay as long as you want. Information and registration forms can be found a www.igma.org.

Jane Graber will be teaching her students to shape and decorate platters, plates and bowls in the same manner their colonial ancestors did in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Jane Graber will be teaching her students to shape and decorate platters, plates and bowls in the same manner their colonial ancestors did in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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Its Show Time!

Mohamad Hafez in his studio with two of his suitcase framed miniature vignettes. Photo by Cole Wilson.

Mohamad Hafez in his studio with two of his suitcase framed miniature vignettes. Photo by Cole Wilson.

Show Committee work goes on for more than a year to bring you each and every Guild Show.  So, it is quite a relief when the countdown gets to single digits and we can say… 2018 Guild Show events commence in 6 days, Wednesday, September 19 with pre-show classes. There are 19 classes on the schedule and even at this late date, it is still possible to sign up for some of them. You may also still sign up for the two tours being offered that Wednesday, the historic homes tour visiting Naumkeag and the Norman Rockwell Museum, and the Miniatures Tour, which will be taking in a local miniatures collection.

A vignette by Mohamad Hafez showing a slice of Syrian life.

A vignette by Mohamad Hafez showing a slice of Syrian life.

Friday night, September 21 the weekend’s events kick off with the Gathering of the Guild: Desserts and Demonstrations event featuring a wide variety of demonstrations by some of the talented artist/dealers you will see in the salesroom later. A bountiful display of desserts, as well as other more health conscious options, will be there for your enjoyment, along with demonstrations on painting techniques, the application of hinges, stitching how-to’s and the making of miniature tassels, to list just a few. You will also have your first chance to take a close-up look at the pieces submitted to the ‘Visions of Miniature Grandeur’ Showcase, and plenty of time to catch up with friends.

This will be Jeannie's first time at the Guild Show and she'll be teaching her students how to create these super cute Halloween treats!

Jeanie Anderson will be a dealer at the Guild Show for the first time this year and will be teaching these super cute Halloween treats.

Saturday, September 22, the salesroom opens at 9 a.m. for IGMA members only, and at 10 a.m. for the general public. If you want to be one of the first to shop and aren’t yet a member, that is easily remedied! Silent auctions will offer additional shopping possibilities outside the salesroom, and a room full of exhibits nearby offers a quiet respite for anyone needing to take a break and be inspired.

When the salesroom closes on Saturday, more fun ensues with a Live Auction and the evening’s buffet dinner and special program, featuring artist and architect Mohamad Hafez, who will be sharing his miniature work with us.

Sunday, September 23 provides one more day to find those special miniatures, either in the salesroom or on the silent auction tables outside. The youngest miniaturists are invited to take part in some free crafting projects midday, and the Small Beginnings table will again be available with treasures priced for their smaller budgets. At 3:30 p.m. though, the carriage turns back into a pumpkin and the magic disappears for another year.

See you there!

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Hey Bidder, Bidder…

A quizzical Sherlock Holmes, a porcelain doll created by IGMA Fellow member Shirley Whitworth, who is now retired.

A quizzical Sherlock Holmes, a porcelain doll created by IGMA Fellow member Shirley Whitworth, who is now retired.

One of the Guild’s most dependable fundraisers is an auction and we have been holding auctions at our annual show for many years to raise the funds necessary to keep the Guild’s educational and community outreach programs functioning. Auction proceeds help to underwrite all Guild efforts, from the Independent Study Award, that grants Fellow members a small stipend to more deeply investigate an aspect of their art, to covering any shortfalls that a Study Program might encounter when participation doesn’t reach anticipated levels. Auction proceeds also allow the Guild to continue to offer miniatures to the next generation of miniaturists at child friendly prices at the show’s Small Beginnings table and to allow all attendees exposure to inspirational miniatures at Guild Show exhibits.

Hall stand by Judy Beals.

Hall stand by Judy Beals.

Auction items are donated by IGMA members of all levels and cover the spectrum from small accessories to porcelain dolls and even structures! Donations may be items created by those members or purchased by them; they may be items they no longer have a place for, and occasionally, they are bequests.

At this year’s show, the Guild will be hosting two different types of auctions: Silent Auctions will run during show hours and the Live Auction will take place at close of sales on Saturday, September 22 in the hotel Atrium. Donations are still arriving and we are grateful for each and every one.

1/12 scale cradle decorated by IGMA Fellow member Mary Grady O'Brien.

1/12 scale cradle decorated by IGMA Fellow member Mary Grady O’Brien.

Fan by Marge Adams.

Fan by Marge Adams.

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