Brooklyn Museum Study Program

Dutch Delftware Monteith Bowl , taught by Lee-Ann Chellis Wessel, IGMA Fellow member.

Dutch Delftware Monteith Bowl , taught by Lee-Ann Chellis Wessel, IGMA Fellow member.

Large cities, like New York, are well known for their historic properties and vast museums, perfect inspiration for a study program you think; unfortunately, hotels in those cities put the cost of hosting a program out of reach to most of our members. This year, it was decided to offer a study program in conjunction with the Guild Show, whose location in Teaneck,New Jersey offers easy access to New York City, without the high cost of actually staying in the city.

Bannister-back Armchair taught by Mark Murphy, IGMA Fellow member. Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

Bannister-back Armchair taught by Mark Murphy, IGMA Fellow member. Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

The Brooklyn Museum was chosen because for their decorative arts galleries, in particular their early Dutch colonial collection which includes the Jan Martense Schenck house dating from the 17th century. Three of the projects chosen for the study program classes come from this early period of American history, the fourth coming from the 19th century.

The program will begin with a tour of the Brooklyn Museum decorative arts galleries, which will allow participants to view all of the class projects that are on display, before returning to the show hotel where they will begin the 18 hours of instruction to recreate these pieces in 1/12 scale.

Fireplace Wall, North Room of the Jan Martense Schenck House, taught by Peter Kendall, IGMA Fellow member. Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

Fireplace Wall, North Room of the Jan Martense Schenck House, taught by Peter Kendall, IGMA Fellow member. Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

For more information on classes and registration, visit www.igma.org.

Thonet Child's Armchair, taught by Bill Studebaker, IGMA Artisan member. Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

Thonet Child’s Armchair, taught by Bill Studebaker, IGMA Artisan member. Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum.

 

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Minis Make the News

Kate Unvers with a collection of miniatures. Mark Makela for the New York Times.

Kate Unvers with a collection of miniatures. Mark Makela for the New York Times.

The May 6 issue of the New York Times includes an article on dollhouse scale miniatures in their Fashion and Style section. From a high end designer, to a professor of anthropology and our very own Darren Scala and Kate Unvers, the article touches on how and why people get involved with miniatures. Every few years it seems like the miniatures hobby pokes its little head above the waters of the larger world to enjoy the fascination of those who were not previously aware of its existence; occasionally miniatures even feature in a major museum exhibition, as in the Otherwordly exhibit at the NYC Museum of Art and Design in 2011.

Many hobbies experience fluctuations in popularity, but the miniatures industry seems to remain rather even. There is a natural turnover in craftsmen and dealers as new artists enter and others leave the marketplace, but the big shows are still big and successful, there are museums that focus on miniatures thriving in various locations around the world, and many artists are able to earn a decent living in the field.

Miniature versions of familiar objects appeal to almost everyone, but whether or not that fascination will lead to an involvement with the hobby is not exactly predictable. In order to survive, this hobby, like all others, needs to attract younger devotees continuously and that can be a challenge. IGMA sponsors several programs that reach out to aspiring miniaturists, crafting sessions and budget-priced miniatures for children at our show, scholarships to Guild School as well as Study Programs, which are open to all, in various locations around the country.

What do you do to spread the word about miniatures? What else could IGMA be doing?

 

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IGMA Guild Fellow Jamie Carrington to Teach “Court Gown of the 1780s” Class in London

carrington2016IGMA Fellow Jamie Carrington will be teaching “Court Gown of the 1780s” in London at the Imperial College London from Tuesday, May 10 through Thursday, May 12, 2016. There are still spaces available to attend this miniature fashion design class! Miniaturists, collectors, and miniature enthusiasts will study under Jamie’s tutelage, and will create a lavish panniered gown in 1:12 scale. The class fee is £265 for IGMA members and £280 for members of the public. To register for “Court Gown of the 1780s” and for location information, please click here.

Jamie brings exceptional knowledge of period gowns, corsetry and underpinnings to his classes. His students will be using pure silk (dyed) for this court gown, and the weight of this fabric and other trimmings will be discussed in detail. Cotton lace will also be used.

Students will be given size 12 Sharps by John James and will learn step-by-step how to execute the bucket panniers that hold the skirt out sideways. The stiffened underskirt will be extensively decorated, as will the lavish over the skirt. These pieces will be sure to complement the bodice.

unnamedStudents in this London class will have access to numerous patterns to use for embellishing the over skirt. In addition, a variety of ribbons, trims and lace will be available. You can certainly craft this gown as you see (and sew) fit!

Before you create any period gown a knowledge of the corsetry and underpinnings is vital to create the right pose of the body and the hang of the gown.

Jamie will carefully instruct students on how to appropriately assemble each gown on to the mannequin provided in class. The final touch? Forming the lavish powdered wig trimming into a style that suits your taste. Students will learn a secret trick to creating drape, movement and gravity.

unnamedOne of the greatest benefits of this particular class by Jamie is that many of these techniques can be applied to other periods of fashion. If you have a knack for great style and love classical periods, this class ought not to be missed!

All materials are provided but students are asked to come to class with small, sharp scissors (to be used on fabric and paper).

This year’s IGMA classes in London will take place days before the 2016 Kensington Dollhouse Festival which is open to the public on Friday, May 13 and Saturday, May 14 at Kensington Town Hall on Hornton Street in London. For show hours and information, please visit dollshousefestival.com.

For more information on Jamie Carrington, click here.

Posted by Kate Ünver

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